11 Dec

Reopening of Linux Padawan

Back in May, we had issues with one of our masters/admins and a padawan and due to respect on both parties, their names will be not named.  Due to this, we had a change in management to Svetlana Belkin (belkinsa), Rafael Laguna (redwolf) and Walter Lapchynski (wxl).

Also, back in May, the Ubuntu community wikis were hit by a major spam attack. Both the Ubuntu community wikis and our wiki were running on the MoinMoin wiki platform.  While the wiks of Ubuntu are still on MoinMoin, we have switched to the MediaWiki platform.  Since we done this, we ask our active members to recreate their profile pages.  The easiest way is to to find your name on the “About Us” page, link that link, and create that page.

We also created a Code of Conduct page.

04 Dec

Master Spotlight: Thomas Ward

Meet Thomas Ward aka teward!

1) How did you first get started using Linux? What distros, software or resources did you use while learning?

. I first started using Linux when attending Carnegie Mellon University (before leaving for another University), back in 2009. They were heavily supportive of the UNIX based environment, as well as Windows and Apple. I first started with Ubuntu 9.04 on my own systems, while having access to Red Hat systems (without administrative privileges, unfortunately) at Carnegie Mellon.

2) While you were learning Linux, was there anybody (or group of people) who acted as a mentor to help you?

. The Ubuntu community at large helped me out with everything I had in terms of issues with Linux. As time progressed, and my skillset evolved, different Ubuntu teams began to pique my interest, and as I started contributing, their skilled members helped me improve on my own skills.

The Internet in general also needs some credit, most “how to do” something tutorials help to some extent.

3) What made you want to join Linux Padawan as a master? What do you hope to gain, personally or professionally, from your involvement?

. Initially, I was invited by one of the founding members of Linux Padawan, to act as a Master if time permitted, and to be a knowledge resource if I could not. I hope to gain additional sight as a helpful community member by my membership in Linux Padawan, even if I can’t actively mentor someone full-time.

I currently am working as the technical contact for the infrastructure that runs the LinuxPadawan site and functionality.  Yay, IT Systems Administration experience!

4) What did you learn most about being a padawan?

. I never was a padawan here. However, I can say that as someone who has received mentoring from others, it is important to note that you will always learn something from a mentor, even if it’s something simple.

5) How are you going to pass on mentoring? What projects will you help them get involved with?

6) Linux Padawan is still a relatively new project, but what has your experience been so far?

. I think Linux Padawan has a lot of benefits of helping individuals get started with Linux, and to get them interested into areas they’re already curious about. It’s a fascinating project, and it has a lot of potential, and will gain support from others over time and more and more mentors and padawans.

7) What do you hope to help your Padawans achieve during your mentoring of them?

. I currently do not have any Padawans, however my overall goal has been to share my knowledge, and help others expand their own by taking information from my own knowledge. This helps others to in turn learn and expand their knowledge, which is the whole point of being a mentor!

8) Outside of Linux Padawan, what projects or community are you involved in?

. I am currently a member of the Ubuntu Server Team, working primarily to keep the {{{nginx}}} packages maintained in Ubuntu. I also work with the Ubuntu Bug Squad, and Ubuntu Bug Control teams to help triage bugs.
.  
. I also provide third-party package repositories for the {{{nginx}}} and {{{znc}}} packages in Ubuntu and Debian, making sure that people on older releases of those distributions have access to more recent patched software.
.  
. I am also currently attending University for a degree in Security and Risk Analysis, focusing on Information and Cyber-Security, to further make myself more marketable to the world. I also work as a member of the IT staff at a private cyber-security firm.

9) What advice do you have for new users who are just starting off and want to learn more about Linux?

. This applies to everything, but… start with the basics. Ask questions to try and learn more, consult knowledge bases and documentation, and try and learn things on your own before asking for the answers. Also take baby-steps – don’t immediately jump into building kernels if you haven’t even mastered how to edit things on the command line or even how to use the command line, and don’t jump around outside your skillsets at first. If you’re starting out with Linux, you start at the basics and work your way out from there.
.
. And remember: ask questions if you have them – you learn more by getting answers from those that know what they’re doing, than doing nothing.

09 Feb

Master Spotlight: cprofitt

Meet cprofitt.

  1. How did you first get started using Linux? What distros, software or resources did you use while learning?

    I first started dabbling with Linux in 1993, but did not convert to using it full-time until 2006. I currently use Fedora 23. I have used Arch, Debian, OpenSUSE and Ubuntu in the past. All of those distros are excellent choices; though some are better for beginners than others.

  2. While you were learning Linux, was there anybody (or group of people) who acted as a mentor to help you?

    I learned a great deal from bodhi.zazen, dhzo, Dave123, and hal14450. The Ubuntu Beginners team is the first team I started contributing with and I learned a great deal about the intricacies of working in a volunteer organization. I learned a great deal about large open source communities working with Mark Shuttleworth, Daniel Holbach, Elizabeth K. Joseph, Michael Hall, and Laura Czajkowski on the Ubuntu Community Council. I also have to give a big shout out to Remy DeCausemaker as a person who continues to inspire me in the FOSS world. Remy and Elizabeth are both people who have successfully made careers in open source.

  3. What made you want to join Linux Padawan as a master? What do you hope to gain, personally or professionally, from your involvement?

    Linux Padawan is non-denominational and has a mission very similar to the Ubuntu Beginners Team. I want to promote open source software without being tied to a specific distribution. I have always enjoyed helping people explore technology from hardware to programming. Open Source makes that exploration both enjoyable and rewarding in a way closed source options do not allow.

  4. What did you learn most about being a padawan?

    When I was first entering the world of Linux and open source I learned that it helps to find a community that is friendly and willing to help. Some groups relied too much on the RTFM response to questions. The Ubuntu Beginners Team was an exemplary example of this and I believe that Linux Padawan mirrors that style. With my current involvement in Fedora I have also discovered that you do not have to write code to contribute. Fedora teams like CommOps and Fedora Magazine make it easy for people to have a positive impact without having to have deep technical skills or the ability to write code.

  5. How are you going to pass on mentoring? What projects will you help them get involved with?

    Due to my day job being systems administration my core focus in mentoring is usually related to that. I am able to code a little, but use what I know to automate repetitive tasks. I like to work with people on how to make use of SSH, GPG, NMAP and other tools.

  6. Linux Padawan is still a relatively new project, but what has your experience been so far?

    I do not have direct experience with Linux Padawan, but the structure is similar to what the ubuntu Beginners Team used. There are also many friendly faces that I remember from the Ubuntu Beginners Team so my on-boarding has been pleasant.

  7. What do you hope to help your Padawans achieve during your mentoring of them?

    I would want to help each Padawan grow their experience with FOSS so that they do not have to rely on closed source software to be productive with their computing resources. Eventually, I want each Padawan to grow comfortable to mentor others.

  8. Outside of Linux Padawan, what projects or community are you involved in?

    I am involved with First Robotics, LUGOR (Linux User Group of Rochester) and Fedora Magazine.

  9. What advice do you have for new users who are just starting off and want to learn more about Linux?

    The first item would be to let Linux Padawan help you. The second would be to try lots of distributions so you find the one that meets your style. The third would be to make sure that the community surrounding that distribution is active, welcoming and helpful.

29 Dec

An excellent resource

We are all ways looking for good quality free teaching books. It seems that we are not the only people. I have come accross an amazing list and am delighted to share it with everyone!
https://github.com/vhf/free-programming-books/blob/master/free-programming-books.md

09 Jan

Welcome

As linuxpadawan gets fully grounded we have some exciting things coming soon. Firstly there will be the cloud server going live thus allowing masters to run the different linux flavours in an environment where padawans can ‘blow them up’ in complete safety. Blowing up servers is one of the best ways to learn! As these cloud instances have a short life expectancy, I have allocated 500 GB of hard drive space for padawans to keep any files / scripts that they need backing up.

08 Jan

Welcome to Linux Padawan’s Blog!

As one of the general admins of Linux Padawan, Svetlana Belkin, said back in December 2014:

Today was the release day of Linux Padawan, a free mentoring service that is aimed for all Linux users, new and old, to learn new skills from masters.   Any one can be a padawan or a master, just come and ask one our members of how to become one.

Linux Padawan already been around for a month and we already have a few padawans learning from our masters.

But as a suggestion from Michael Hall, one of the Ubuntu Community mangers, we have opened up a blog that will focus on the news of the service and showing off the projects of our padawans as the learn from their masters.  We hope that we offer the best mentoring for our padawans in order for them to grow.